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Little Willow [userpic]

Booklist: (Mostly) Realistic Graphic Novels

February 21st, 2013 (08:31 am)
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One of my favorite people asked me for graphic novel recommendations yesterday, and this is the list I drafted for her. It includes some of my favorites as well as some volumes I knew she'd appreciate because of the art or the storyline or both.

For those of you shocked at the lack of caped crusaders here, don't be too upset; I love those stories, too! This list leans heavily towards the realistic...until you reach the last few titles, because I couldn't help myself. The Coraline graphic novel is one of the best book-to-GN adaptations I've ever read, and if I didn't list it here, along with some Golden books, my heart would hurt. Then, of course, there are the younger series which employ talking animals - and amoebas - but I at least began the list with realistic tales:

Graphic novels for the younger set, sweet stories and adorable art:
Smile by Raina Telgemeier
The Baby-Sitters Club Graphix adaptations by Raina Telgemeier (Get all 4 volumes)
Drama by Raina Telgemeier

The Babymouse series by Jennifer L. Holm and Matt Holm
The Squish series by Jennifer L. Holm and Matt Holm
The Flying Beaver Brothers series by Maxwell Eaton III

Historical:
The Storm in the Barn by Matt Phelan

Throwback/tongue-in-cheek:
Teen Boat! by Dave Roman and John Green
The Alison Dare series by J. Torres and Jason Bone

Artistic protagonists:
The Plain Janes series by Cecil Castellucci and Jim Rugg
Emiko Superstar by Mariko Tamaki and Steve Rolston

Contemporary:
12 Reasons Why I Love Her by Joëlle Jones and Jamie S. Rich

Modern style, dystopic stories:
Uglies graphic novels by Scott Westerfeld and Devin Grayson, illustrated by Steven Cummings
Coraline by Neil Gaiman, adapted and illustrated by P. Craig Russell
Talent by Christopher Golden, Tom Sniegoski, and Paul Azaceta
The Baltimore series by Christopher Golden and Mike Mignola

Which of these graphic novels have you read and enjoyed? Which graphic novels would you recommend to me? Leave a comment below and let me know!

Little Willow [userpic]

Baltimore: The Widow and the Tank by Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden

February 21st, 2013 (07:05 pm)
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Baltimore The Widow and the Tank by Mike Mignola and Christopher GoldenBaltimore: The Widow and the Tank by Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden

A blood-curdling double feature! Eisner Award–winning horror master Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden present this horrific double feature about a widow with a not-quite-dead husband and a child-killing vampire taking refuge from something even worse.

Praise for the Baltimore series:

"It still takes something special to impose a unifying vision, and Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden have got it." - The Wall Street Journal

"These Baltimore miniseries over at Dark Horse have provided us with the type of genuine Gothic horror that we crave...this is a great read." - Complex

Get Baltimore: The Widow and the Tank from your local comic book store today! UPC: 7 61568 19678 8 00111

Find out where the story began: Read the illustrated novel Baltimore, or, the Steadfast Tin Soldier and the Vampire, the tale that inspired the subsequent comics and graphic novels.

When Lord Henry Baltimore awakens the wrath of a vampire on the hellish battlefields of World War I, the world is forever changed. For a virulent plague has been unleashed -- a plague that even death cannot end.

Now the lone soldier in an eternal struggle against darkness, Baltimore summons three old friends to a lonely inn -- men whose travels and fantastical experiences incline them to fully believe in the evil that is devouring the soul of mankind. As the men await their old friend, they share their tales of terror and misadventure, and contemplate what part they will play in Baltimore's timeless battle. Before the night is through, they will learn what is required to banish the plague -- and the creature who named Baltimore his nemesis -- once and for all.

Baltimore was named one of Booklist's Top 10 SF/Fantasy books of the year - and for good reason.

Learn more about this inspired gothic take on Hans Christian Andersen's story The Steadfast Tin Soldier.

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